Design Challenge

Time To Streamline

February 10th, 2010

The organically shaped case blends perfectly into the strap of this design to create a single motion concept.

Shades of blue and green make up the display, each of the segments indicating a unit of time. Hours on the left, groups of 10 minutes on the right and single minutes in the center.

The line pattern that makes up the interface runs in the same direction as the strap. A natural look with an unusual display. Read the rest of this entry »

Speak To Me

February 10th, 2010

Use this watch to connect to your electronic devices via Bluetooth technology so that you can control your mp3 player and answer mobile phone calls wirelessly.

A speaker and microphone are integrated so that you can communicate clearly without the need to wear earphones.

The different colored finish on the aluminum strap and case creates a contrasting look and the large and easy to navigate buttons and digital time make this concept simple to use. Read the rest of this entry »

Big Brother Paranoia

February 9th, 2010

Straight out of Nineteen Eighty-Four, this concept web camera will not only enhance your video calling experience but will keep your criminal mind at bay.

Reminiscent of a surveillance camera, this smart little device has a universal clip so it can be attached to any computer or sit on your desk. The camera can be easily rotated to the desired position and works via USB.

The stainless steel casing and red “on” LED add to the menacing appearance. Read the rest of this entry »

Time Capsule

February 9th, 2010

The lens that covers the interface of this concept wraps around the sides giving the appearance of a futuristic vehicle.

The bright, polished case has a strong, modern appearance and the time display is set deep beneath the lens.

The cryptic timing is shown in geometrical orange bars; hours on the left, five minute intervals 5-55 and single minutes 1-4 on the right. Read the rest of this entry »

Off The Radar

February 8th, 2010

Extremely simple to read, this concept splits hours and minutes between the upper and lower screens basically in the same positions as numbers on two clock faces. Four single minutes are displayed in the center of the lower screen.

With contemporary styling in a stainless steel case with matching wrist band, the display has the appearance of a measuring device or radar.

The slightly recessed smoked lens is completely black and adds a sense of mystery when no LEDs are illuminated. Read the rest of this entry »

Molecular Timing

February 8th, 2010

This will take you back to high school chemistry class. Five purple molecules, five blue molecules and ten orange molecules create the time display on this concept. Time reading is simplified by color coded LEDs.

Each molecule appears to be trapped beneath the acrylic lens, the surface of which is raised and runs over the edges of the case to emphasize depth.

The curved stainless steel case blends into the strap and achieves a good fit with the display. This design has the added benefit of a USB rechargeable system to ensure battery longevity and maximum brightness. Read the rest of this entry »

RPM

February 5th, 2010
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A great look for DJ’s and ideal for time telling in the dark, this concept has the appearance of a turntable with its black face raised at different levels.

The absence of a dial or numbers on the round face create a mysterious look, but the time can be read easily; rings of light at the edge of the face indicate hours in blue and five minute intervals in green, in exactly the same positions as on a clock face. Four red LED’s at the top show minutes 1-4. The time display is activated by touching the sensor in the center of the face. Thanks to James F. for submitting idea.

Kisai RPM is now available to buy here.

Read the rest of this entry »

21st Century Funk

February 5th, 2010

Attractive curved glass with offset sides gives this concept its unusual appearance. The stainless steel case is combined with a leather wrist band to provide a comfortable feel and contrasting look.

The interface has three different LED colors. Blue to indicate hours on the right, red to indicate the progression of minutes in groups of 5 on the left and green blocks on the right to indicate minutes 1-4.

A strong look with a video-game style display makes this concept stand out. Read the rest of this entry »

Cubic Equation

February 4th, 2010

A simple continuation of cubes form the interface of this concept. The formation of blocks are set in a strong, black IP coated stainless steel case.

The numbered time display is easy to calculate and the units of time are reinforced by a clear color code; hours in blue, five minute intervals in yellow and single minutes 1-4 in green. The position of these correspond to a similar position to numbers on a clock face.

Subtle random differences in the height of the acrylic cubes on the face break the symmetry of the design and give a video game image. Read the rest of this entry »

Data Flow

February 4th, 2010

The square shaping of this design brings an original form to Tokyoflash. The simple geometric pattern in the display is made up of lines and squares giving a subtle binary code feel; squares being “0″ and lines being “1″.

Stainless steel forms the body and the extruded shapes within the acrylic lens remain unlit before the time is displayed through digital tube technology to illuminate the shapes. The bracelet achieves a fit with the interface, and appears to be running data around your wrist as time passes through the face.

Numbers on the face simplify reading the time; hours in the top line, groups of five minutes in a similar position as on a clock face and single minutes blended neatly between. Read the rest of this entry »

Neon Encapsulated

February 3rd, 2010

The tubular appearance created by the LEDs in this concept give an 80′s disco feel.  Like colored neon bars, the lights are set beneath the glass giving a sense of depth.

Uniquely shaped, the oval case tapers out to meet the strap, both of which are made of IP coated stainless steel.

The neon stripes indicate the time, hours, groups of ten minutes and single minutes color coded in green, blue and pink. Read the rest of this entry »

Electric Blue

February 3rd, 2010

Like streams of water, the electric blue subsurface LEDs beneath diffuse light to create stunning overlapping lines of time.

The display is set into a polished stainless steel frame and the rubber strap is fed neatly beneath the chassis of the watch.

Sharp, sleek and ultra modern, the curve at the front stands out to make this design different.

Hours are displayed at the front so easy to see at a glance, groups of ten minutes 10-50 and single minutes at the back. Read the rest of this entry »

Centrifugal Force

February 3rd, 2010

The USB cable appears out of the top of this speaker design creating a very unusual appearance.  Plug into your Mac or PC and the sound will emanate from the holes around the bottom.

An equalizer on top in neon green will create an electrifying animation and the volume control is neatly situated above. The sleek, mirrored case gives a scientific, futuristic look. Read the rest of this entry »

Bright Time

February 3rd, 2010
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This striking concept watch design is deceptively simple to read; three windows on the face separate units of time.

Twelve digits in the top screen indicate hours, the bottom screen indicates five minute groups and the uniquely shaped screen to the left indicates four single minutes. Read the rest of this entry »

Charting Time

February 3rd, 2010

On first glance, this design might look like a futuristic communication device or a tool for mapping your running distances.

Luckily, it’s a lot less complicated than that. The LED display uses blue bars in the center to indicate hours, cyan blocks around the edge indicate 5 minute groups and the green blocks on the right of the screen indicate single minutes 1-4.

The standard case is augmented with steel bars that extend across the face to protect the screen and match the mechanical image. Read the rest of this entry »